Politics of The Machines

About

The overall thematic of the POM-conference series is the question of how the machine and technology impact and contextualize artistic and cultural production and our perception of the world. Moreover, it is aiming at investigating the histories, theories and practices of machines and technologies in-between and beyond disciplines. It seeks to question the governing ideas in the sciences and the humanities through critical engagement with and empowerment of activities of creative production in the relational field of culture – technology – umwelt.

Current Edition

Rogue Research

Within the Politics of the Machines conference series – following Copenhagen (2018) and Beirut (2019), the third POM conference will take place in Berlin September 13-18, 2021, hosted by the chair for Open Science at the Technische Universität Berlin and the Einstein Center Digital Future.

The conference will be comprised of a series of tracks, panels, workshops and a student exhibition. The tracks have been generated based on a call for track-submissions contextualized under the wider frame of ‘Politics of the Machines – Rogue Research’, and each track has a thematic call-for-participation.

POM Beirut 2019

In an area afflicted with multifaceted conflicts, art can become an agent for dialogue, an agent for resolution, or it can get itself involved in the clash. The goal of this edition of POM will be to tackle art practices and the relation of art to the machine. In parallel, it will also focus on understanding the influence and relation between art and conflict. POM will tend to explore the connection between the violence of conflict and violence as a process in art production; the role of conflict in the sociopolitical environment and how it relates to the field of art, science, and technology.

POM Copenhagen 2018

The question of how the machine impacts and contextualizes artistic production and perception is the overall topic of the conference. Recent research on the impact of machines and technology on art places the machine in the centre of ‘ecologies’ (Fuller), ‘archaeologies’ (Parikka) and ‘aesthetics of interaction’ (Kwastek) pointing towards a ‘techno-ontology’ (Broeckmann).